3 of our favorite trends from NY Now

NEW YORK- The latest installment of NY Now showcased a wide range of eye-catching introductions, with a healthy dose of color, whimsy and cleverness. Several exhibitors were showing in the U.S. for the first time, and others highlighted the businesses they debuted during the pandemic. Here are a few of the themes we saw at the show.   

Sustainability 

A sustainability theme permeated the booths, as exhibitors touted the eco-friendly processes and materials they used – or didn’t use. Candle maker and accessory company Ozaiz – which launched at the show – purposely picked sustainable materials for its line and packaging, even limiting its use of plastic when possible. For her namesake company, Vallnez Mozell uses dead stock textiles for its pillows and collapsible chairs, resulting in limited edition collections – as well as fewer items headed to the landfill, she said. 

The Artisanry NY Now
The Artisanry debuted lamps made of raffia for a natural look. (Photos by Andrea Lillo)

The Artisanry debuted lamps with shades and bases made of raffia, while Be Home debuted a sandstone collection, including a wine bottle holder. Primitive Twig displayed sculptures made of discarded and vintage items, including doll heads, tin toys and spoons.   

Treleaf uses locally sourced woods in its plant accessories to bring more greenery indoors. The plant accessory company uses wood for its stakes, and the designs are inspired by plants. “It turns plants into pieces of art,” said Zeba Parker, spokesperson. New for market were smaller stakes as well as celebration ones, so people could write messages on them if giving a plant as a gift.  

Elemense NY Now
Elemense offers ceramic infusers in the shape of stones for a more natural feel. (Photos by Andrea Lillo)

In the health and wellness category, Elemense showed its stone-shaped ceramic diffusers, while Hit the Spot offered its cork massage ball sets, which come in gift boxes. 

Personalization and Personality 

Emma Lewis, an art history PhD and collector of images from 1910-1930, launched her stationery brand The Twentieth during the pandemic, and released her largest number of new cards at the show. Her designs have a women empowerment theme, as she pairs images of ladies from her collection with contemporary copy.  

French company Elements Lighting brought its lighting décor to the U.S. for the first time. Each tabletop item has a shaped filament that spells out an expression or sentiment, like Fly Me to the Moon or Love, for example, or icons like the Eiffel Tower.  

Glasstats NY Now
Glasstats allows partygoers to personalize their drinkware with one-time-use stickers, which dissolve in the dishwasher. Its fill-in-the-blank set is one of its newest items. (Photos by Andrea Lillo)

Marking one’s drinkware at parties becomes more fun with Glasstats, one-time use stickers that dissolve in the dishwasher. Available in such themes as Happy Hour and Christmas, they allow people to add personality to their glasses. New sets include fill-in-the-blank options.  

Another sticker item were Stickies, which are edible stickers made from sugar paper. New items included house and snow globe sets.  

JK Adams, the Vermont-based wood products maker celebrating its 80th year, showed its new Wild Rose collection for Mother’s Day, including charcuterie board, paddle, appetizing tray and slate coasters. It also demonstrated its customization abilities in another booth, monogramming small cutting boards for attendees.  

Convenience and Collapsibility 

Some exhibitors upgraded the mundane. This is A Stickup, for example, showcased its line of self-sticking window blinds in fun colors and designs, and made of a stiff polyester fabric; it’s cuttable to any size window. Holiball offers oversized, blowup ornaments made of UV-resistant engineered polymer —  the largest is 30 inches in diameter – which can be deflated and stored easily in a small box. Vegan brand Pixie Mood showed a suitcase that can collapse when not in use.  

Holliball NY Now
Holliball’s inflatable ornaments can be easily stored when deflated and not in use. (Photos by Andrea Lillo)

One other notable introduction was the Splitflask, a dual-chamber vacuum insulated tumbler. Founder Riz Nwosu developed the Splitflask for his wife, who struggled with balancing her water bottle and coffee while headed to work. The Split Flask allows two beverages to be in one portable vessel, and they can be either hot or cold. It holds 15 ounces per side for a total of 30 ounces. It’s available in pink, green, black and white.  

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